TITLE

More is less: 17 nutritional trade-offs that let you eat more

AUTHOR(S)
Goulart, Frances Sherida
PUB. DATE
February 1995
SOURCE
Total Health;Feb95, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p34
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents diet trade-offs that cut on fat. Consumption of fewer calories by women on low-fat regimen; Recommended daily allowance range; Physiologic response to reduction of carbohydrates.
ACCESSION #
9502071456

 

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