TITLE

PRIMING THE PUMP

AUTHOR(S)
Lavelle, Marianne
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;4/21/2003, Vol. 134 Issue 13, p41
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Examines the revival of Iraq's oil industry, following the 2003 Iraq War. View that Iraq's future depends on its oil; Possible role of former chief engineer and manager in Iraq's Ministry of Oil, Muhammad-Ali Zainy, who defected to the U.S.; Obstacles to rebuilding the oil industry; Deterioration of Iraq's oil fields; Companies which specialize in repair work; Views of oil analysts.
ACCESSION #
9515939

 

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