TITLE

Japan's Energy Policy Still Murky Three Years After Fukushima

PUB. DATE
April 2014
SOURCE
Power;Apr2014, Vol. 158 Issue 4, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the announcement made by the administration of Shinzo Abe, Prime Minister of Japan, in February 2014 regarding the first draft energy policy since the Fukushima crisis in 2011. Topics discussed include nuclear power, along with renewable energy and fossil fuels to be integral to meet the energy needs of the nation, the Basic Energy Plan, and the Institute of Energy Economics of Japan (IEEJ).
ACCESSION #
95469633

 

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