TITLE

Triumph of the root-heads

AUTHOR(S)
Gould, Stephen Jay
PUB. DATE
January 1996
SOURCE
Natural History;Jan96, Vol. 105 Issue 1, p10
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses how root-heads or Rhizocephala can be used to evaluate several aspects of the concept of evolution. Consideration of Darwin's theories of natural selection; Sources of nutrition necessary for the function of externa; Research on barnacle parasites by zoologists; Use of Rhizocephala to illustrate degeneration in the evolution of parasites; Complexity of the life cycle in female rhizocephalans; Diversity in the delivery systems for adult primordiums; How root-heads can produce large numbers of larvae; Assumptions made by naturalists regarding natural selection.
ACCESSION #
9601050780

 

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