TITLE

How do walking, standing, and resting influence transtibial amputee residual limb fluid volume?

AUTHOR(S)
Sanders, Joan E.; Cagle, John C.; Allyn, Katheryn J.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Ciol, Marcia A.
PUB. DATE
February 2014
SOURCE
Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2014, Vol. 51 Issue 2, p201
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The purpose of this research was to determine how fluid volume changes in the residual limbs of people with transtibial amputation were affected by activity during test sessions with equal durations of resting, standing, and walking. Residual limb extracellular fluid volume was measured using biompedance analysis in 24 participants. Results showed that all subjects lost fluid volume during standing with equal weight-bearing, averaging a loss rate of -0.4%/min and a mean loss over the 25 min test session of 2.6% (standard deviation [SD] 1.1). Sixteen subjects gained limb fluid volume during walking (mean gain of 1.0% [SD 2.5]), and fifteen gained fluid volume during rest (mean gain of 1.0% [SD 2.2]). Walking explained only 39.3% of the total session fluid volume change. There was a strong correlation between walk and rest fluid volume changes (−0.81). Subjects with peripheral arterial disease experienced relatively high fluid volume gains during sitting but minimal changes or losses during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit transitioning. Healthy female subjects experienced high fluid volume changes during transitioning from sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit. The differences in fluid volume response among subjects suggest that volume accommodation technologies should be matched to the activity-dependent fluid transport characteristics of the individual prosthesis user.
ACCESSION #
96033266

 

Related Articles

  • Preliminary investigation of residual-limb fluid volume changes within one day. Sanders, Joan E.; Allyn, Katheryn J.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Myers, Timothy R.; Ciol, Marcia A.; Tsai, Elaine C. // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2012, Vol. 49 Issue 10, p1467 

    The purpose of this research was to investigate rates of residual-limb fluid volume change within one day for people with transtibial limb loss. Rates of fluid volume change during 30 min test sessions of sitting, standing, and walking activities were measured twice a day, once in the morning...

  • How do sock ply changes affect residual-limb fluid volume in people with transtibial amputation? Sanders, Joan E.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Allyn, Katheryn J.; Myers, Timothy R.; Ciol, Marcia A.; Tsai, Elaine C. // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2012, Vol. 49 Issue 2, p241 

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of sock addition and removal on residual-limb fluid volume in people using prosthetic limbs. We used bioimpedance analysis to measure residual-limb extracellular fluid volume on 28 transtibial amputee subjects during 30 min test...

  • Metabolic analysis of male servicemembers with transtibial amputations carrying military loads. Schnall, Barri L.; Wolf, Erik J.; Bell, Johanna C.; Gambel, Jeffrey; Bensel, Carolyn K. // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2012, Vol. 49 Issue 4, p535 

    For servicemembers who have sustained amputa­tions and wish to return to Active Duty, performing common military tasks is essential. The purpose of this study was to examine the metabolic requirements of servicemembers with transtibial amputations wearing a loaded rucksack and walking at a...

  • How does adding and removing liquid from socket bladders affect residual-limb fluid volume? Sanders, Joan E.; Cagle, John C.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Allyn, Kathryn J.; Myers, Timothy R. // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2013, Vol. 50 Issue 6, p845 

    Adding and removing liquid from socket bladders is a means for people with limb loss to accommodate residual-limb volume change. We fit 19 people with transtibial amputation using their regular prosthetic socket with fluid bladders on the inside socket surface to undergo cycles of bladder liquid...

  • Effects of elevated vacuum on in-socket residual limb fluid volume: Case study results using bioimpedance analysis. Sanders, Joan E.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Myers, Timothy R.; Allyn, Katheryn J. // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2011, Vol. 48 Issue 10, p1231 

    Bioimpedance analysis was used to measure the residual limb fluid volume of seven transtibial amputee subjects using elevated vacuum sockets and nonelevated vacuum sockets. Fluid volume changes were assessed during sessions with the subjects sitting, standing, and walking. In general, fluid...

  • Load applied on bone-anchored transfemoral prosthesis: Characterization of a prosthesis--A pilot study. Frossard, Laurent; Hggstrm, Eva; Hagberg, Kerstin; Brnemark, Rickard // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2013, Vol. 50 Issue 5, p619 

    The objectives of this study were to (1) record the inner-prosthesis loading during activities of daily living (ADLs), (2) present a set of variables comparing loading data, and (3) provide an example of characterization of two prostheses. The load was measured at 200 Hz using a multi-axial...

  • Influence of prior activity on residual limb volume and shape measured using plaster casting: Results from individuals with transtibial limb loss. Sanders, Joan E.; Severance, Michael R.; Swartzendruber, David L.; Allyn, Katheryn J.; Ciol, Marcia A. // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2013, Vol. 50 Issue 7, p1007 

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether prior activity affected the shape of a plaster cast taken of a transtibial residual limb. Plaster casts were taken twice on one day in 24 participants with transtibial limb loss, with 5 s between doffing and casting in one trial (PDI-5s) and...

  • Coronal plane socket stability during gait in persons with transfemoral amputation: Pilot study. Fatone, Stefania; Dillon, Michael; Stine, Rebecca; Tillges, Robert // Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development;2014, Vol. 51 Issue 8, p1217 

    Little research describes which transfemoral socket design features are important for coronal plane stability, socket comfort, and gait. Our study objectives were to (1) relate socket comfort during gait to a rank order of changes in ischial containment (IC) and tissue loading and (2) compare...

  • Keeping Pace with Technology. Salvo Myers, Beth // Rehab Management: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Rehabilitatio;Jan/Feb2013, Vol. 26 Issue 1, p36 

    The article describes how physical therapists can integrate technology to improve outcomes in gait and balance training and assessment. It states that “low-tech” interventions have been used in assessment and treatment of gait and balance; Assessment and treatment aim to improve...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics