TITLE

Renewable Integration by End --Use Thermal Devices

AUTHOR(S)
Upadhye, Harshal; Domitrovic, Ron; Hirahara, Nohealani; Ifuku, Earle; Goo, Mathew; Somdecerff, John
PUB. DATE
May 2013
SOURCE
ASHRAE Transactions;2013, Vol. 119 Issue 2, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Renewable energy generated by sources like wind and solar is unpredictable. Sometimes the renewable energy is available when it's not needed and vice-versa. These resources ramp up or down very quickly depending on the weather -- wind gust will rapidly increase the output from a wind farm or a cloud cover will decrease output from a photovoltaic installation. Integrating these renewables in the electricity grid is a challenge for the grid operators who are always trying to balance supply and demand of electricity. Currently utilities and grid operators use existing generating assets and ramp them up or down to balance this fluctuating generation. This ramp up and down causes wear and tear as well as maintenance issues on expensive generating assets. End-use thermal devices like water heaters offer an existing and a cheaper resource to help balance load and generation. This paper presents analysis of a utility SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) data. Total load on the system, output from each generator on the system and frequency are presented. The results show the effects of wind on the system, particularly on the generators that are used to balance the load and generation. With twice as much wind coming online by end of 2012 in this particular utilities territory, wind integration is high priority for the system operators. A discussion on how residential electric resistance water heaters can help mitigate the issues related to wind integration is also provided. This same analysis can also be applied to other intermittent renewable generation.
ACCESSION #
96045807

 

Related Articles

  • Where the Renewables Are.  // Electric Perspectives;Nov/Dec2007, Vol. 32 Issue 6, p32 

    The article reports the areas in the U.S. where renewable energy sources are available. Solar power is hottest in the Northwest and northern California, Montana, Nevada, and Utah. Biomass resources has the same abundance in California, the Northwest, the upper Midwest, northern New England and...

  • TOMORROW'S ENERGY TODAY. Chiles, James R. // Audubon;Jan1990, Vol. 92 Issue 1, p59 

    Discusses the use of renewable power sources in the United States. Examination of how fossil fuels have been embedded into the U.S. economy; Role of conservation in allowing the American economy to grow from 1973 to 1986; Lessons learned from wind-farm experience; Description of the...

  • Morocco leads on renewables feedstock. GAVIN, JAMES // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;10/28/2015, Vol. 59 Issue 43, p32 

    The article reports on the strong performance of the renewables feedstock sector of Morocco in 2015. Topics covered include the improving wind and solar power schemes implemented in the country. Also mentioned is the aim of the country to look for alternative sources to enhance the energy supply...

  • energy rush. Townsend, Mark // Geographical (Campion Interactive Publishing);May2002, Vol. 74 Issue 5, p38 

    Explores the prospects of alternative energy sources for resolving the energy crisis around the world and ending the dependence on Middle East oil reserves. Percentage of European and U.S. energy that comes from renewable sources; Obstacles to efforts toward renewable energy sources; Growth of...

  • Integrating Variable Renewable Generation in Utility Operations. Jones, Lawrence E. // Utility Automation & Engineering T&D;Apr2009, Vol. 14 Issue 4, p32 

    The article focuses on the challenges faced in incorporating wind and solar energy into utility operations. It also discusses the tools being developed in order to make it possible for utilities to incorporate variable resources while keeping grid reliability. It noted that utilities and power...

  • Energies of the Future.  // Scholastic News -- Edition 3;4/17/2006, Vol. 62 Issue 22, p3 

    The article describes the benefits of solar and wind power as energy sources. With solar power, sunlight is used to warm houses, heat bath water and even cook food. Wind power has the capability to generate electricity when wind turns the blades on a wind turbine. Solar and wind power produce...

  • Clean Power.  // Weekly Reader News - Edition 4;4/20/2007, Vol. 88 Issue 23, p5 

    The article provides information on some environmentally friendly energy sources used in the U.S. The author cites how these energy sources produce electricity and the states that used these kind of energy. These alternatives will include solar energy, energy produced from windmills, and water...

  • Winding up for the challenge. Lee, Andrew // Engineer (00137758);9/10/2004, Vol. 293 Issue 7659, p5 

    No abstract available.

  • RENEWABLE ENERGY: MOVING INTO THE MAINSTREAM. Blankinship, Steve // Power Engineering;Jan2005, Vol. 109 Issue 1, p22 

    Discusses the various forms of renewable energy. Availability of photovoltaic systems; Reason for the growth of hydroelectric power; Benefits of the electronic control capabilities of modern wind turbines; Impact of technology on the increase of solar electricity production.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics