TITLE

A trinity of faiths

AUTHOR(S)
J.W.
PUB. DATE
November 1996
SOURCE
World & I;Nov96, Vol. 11 Issue 11, p207
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the three Chinese faiths, Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism. Involvement of faiths in social relations, private and public; Core doctrines.
ACCESSION #
9610314646

 

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