TITLE

Statement on the Senate decision to bring the Chemical Weapons Convention to a vote

AUTHOR(S)
Clinton, William J.
PUB. DATE
April 1997
SOURCE
Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents;4/21/97, Vol. 33 Issue 16, p536
SOURCE TYPE
Government Documents
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Details the United States President's statement welcoming the unanimous agreement by the Senate to bring the Chemical Weapons Convention to a vote. Agreements concerning the use of riot control agents; Widespread, bipartisan, and growing support for the Chemical Weapons Convention.
ACCESSION #
9706096154

 

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