TITLE

Technology and the baby boom echo

AUTHOR(S)
M.A.M.
PUB. DATE
November 1996
SOURCE
Tech & Learning;Nov/Dec96, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p57
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Makes observations on the U.S. Department of Education's report on increased school enrollment, titled `A Special Back-to-School Report: The Baby Boom Echo'. Impact of the baby boom on technology; Department of Education Secretary Richard Riley's conclusion on the report.
ACCESSION #
9707150865

 

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