TITLE

Oasis

AUTHOR(S)
Hammer, Joshua
PUB. DATE
May 2003
SOURCE
New Republic;5/26/2003, Vol. 228 Issue 20, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Maybe it was the morning in May 2003 that TNT Express set up shop in the lobby, offering door-to-door courier service from Baghdad to anywhere in the world in four days. Or perhaps it was the announcement of weekly, $650 flights to Amman, which sent scores of Iraq-weary correspondents scrambling to buy tickets. Whatever the case, for the hundred or so journalists who remain hunkered down at the Palestine Hotel, an earth-toned early '80s relic towering above the Tigris River, a change has definitely come over this place, the first stirrings of postwar normality. The Palestine Hotel was in some ways synonymous with the Iraqi war. On March 17, with the U.S. military preparing to attack Iraq, Ministry of Information goons removed correspondents from the more luxurious Al Rasheed Hotel across the river and re-based them in this down-at-the-heels edifice just off Al Fardos Square. Three weeks later, with fighting raging throughout the city, a U.S. Army tank shell slammed a fifteenth-floor balcony at the Palestine, killing two photographers. But despite all this, the Palestine Hotel also provides a glimpse of the burgeoning freedoms of postwar Iraq.
ACCESSION #
9772540

 

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