TITLE

Processing relative clauses in Chinese as a second language

AUTHOR(S)
Xu, Yi
PUB. DATE
October 2014
SOURCE
Second Language Research;Oct2014, Vol. 30 Issue 4, p439
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This project investigates second language (L2) learners’ processing of four types of Chinese relative clauses crossing extraction types and demonstrative-classifier (DCl) positions. Using a word order judgment task with a whole-sentence reading technique, the study also discusses how psycholinguistic theories bear explanatory power in L2 data. An overall preference for DCl-first structures and an advantage of DCl-subject relative clauses over the other three structures were found. Results were largely compatible with the filler-gap domain theory and indicated a weak subject-gap advantage. These motivations are subject to influences from other factors, and a multi-constraint proposal was proposed.
ACCESSION #
98483806

 

Related Articles

  • The Effects of Word-Order and Case Marking Information on the Processing of Japanese. Yamashita, Hiroko // Journal of Psycholinguistic Research;Mar1997, Vol. 26 Issue 2, p163 

    Many studies in processing English report that verb information plays a significant role in processing the rest of the sentence (e.g., Boland & Tanenhaus, 1991). Japanese is subject-object-verb (SOV), head-final language with the phenomena of scrambling and phonologically null pronouns. The fact...

  • Das Rätsel von SVO beim Erlernen des Deutschen - Warum ist SVO so leicht, SOV dagegen so schwer produzierbar? Mi-Young Lee // Zeitschrift für Interkulturellen Fremdsprachenunterricht;Apr2012, Vol. 17 Issue 1, p75 

    The acquisition of word order in German is one of the most intensively researched areas in second language acquisition studies. This article will begin by showing the limits of explanatory approaches discussed in the current research (developmental sequences on one hand, transfer on the other),...

  • In behalf v. on behalf; and a nod to message therapists. Wood, Alden // Communication World;Oct/Nov96, Vol. 13 Issue 8, p40 

    Cautions on the use of incorrectly used quotations. Tendency to corrupt meaning of message; Distinction between use of `in behalf of' and `on behalf of'; Proper use of plural and singular verbs.

  • EFFECTS OF L2 LEARNING ORIENTATIONS AND IMPLEMENTATION INTENTIONS ON SELF-REGULATION. WEN-TA TSENG; YU-JEN CHANG; HSING-FU CHENG // Psychological Reports;Aug2015, Vol. 117 Issue 1, p319 

    In this study, a classic L2 learning orientation framework and a multi-faceted implementation intention construct were used to predict self-regulation. Attention was particularly paid to the way in which different types of implementation intentions predicted the self-regulatory capacity. A...

  • Perception of speech rhythm in second language: the case of rhythmically similar L1 and L2. Ordin, Mikhail; Polyanskaya, Leona // Frontiers in Psychology;Mar2015, Vol. 6, p1 

    We investigated the perception of developmental changes in timing patterns that happen in the course of second language (L2) acquisition, provided that the native and the target languages of the learner are rhythmically similar (German and English). It was found that speech rhythm in L2 English...

  • A Comparison of the L2 Motivational Self System Between Chinese EFL and ESL Learners. ZHANG Jianying // Chinese Journal of Applied Linguistics (De Gruyter);Sep2016, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p269 

    This present study attempts to conduct a comparison of the tripartite model of L2 Motivational Self System in two different learning contexts, Chinese EFL and ESL learning settings. It was designed using a mixed methods approach, with a primary questionnaire instrument being supported by...

  • N'-ellipsis and the structure of noun phrases in Chinese and Japanese. Saito, Mamoru; Lin, T.-H.; Murasugi, Keiko // Journal of East Asian Linguistics;Jul2008, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p247 

    It has been widely assumed since Kitagawa and Ross (Linguist Anal 9: 19–53, 1982) that noun phrases in Chinese and Japanese are quite similar in structure. They are N-final in surface word order, they employ “modifying markers” ( de in Chinese and no in Japanese) extensively,...

  • Response to Haber, Haber, and Furlin. Crawford, June; Dworet, Don; Fisher, Peter; Kelly, Carol; Rubin, Jane // Reading Research Quarterly;Winter1984, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p246 

    The article presents a letter to the editor regarding the study on the concept of word length by specifying the number of letters in each word.

  • One word or two?  // Office Professional;Jun2011, Vol. 31 Issue 6, p3 

    A quiz regarding the use of one word or two-words in a sentence is presented.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics