TITLE

Wind dominates renewable energy but solar powers on

PUB. DATE
November 2014
SOURCE
ENDS (Environmental Data Services);Nov2014, Issue 477, p52
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the annual "Digest of United Kingdom Energy Statistics" report published by the British Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) in July 2014. Topics explored include the improved renewable electricity production capacity of Great Britain, the deployment of renewable energy sources including onshore wind and landfill gas, and the electricity generated from gas, nuclear, and coal sources.
ACCESSION #
99267557

 

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