TITLE

Letter on Good Girls, Bad Girls, and Bad Boys

AUTHOR(S)
Pollack, Barbara; Bee, Susan; Schor, Mira
PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
M/E/A/N/I/N/G: An Anthology of Artists' Writings, Theory & Criti;2000, p46
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
Presents a response to the article "Why We Need Bad Girls Rather Than Good Ones!" by Corinne Robins. Reaction to the definition of a bad girl artist by Robins; Role of female sexual experience in feminist art; Views on female sharing in the male experience of violation; Definition of bad boys.
ACCESSION #
18652812

 

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