TITLE

Chapter 8: BRACHIOPODA: the Lamp Shells

PUB. DATE
June 1979
SOURCE
Fieldbook of Pacific Northwest Sea Creatures;1979, p74
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Book Chapter
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the phylum Brachiopoda. Brachiopods look like living fossils. They resemble clams, but, unlike clams that are buried in the sand, brachiopods hang from the surfaces of rocks and underwater cliffs by tough, muscular stems, and look like small, brown crabapples. Brachiopods are similar to overgrown zoöids. Both gather food with ciliated tentacles; but in the case of a brachiopod, there are two coiled arms, one on each side of the mouth, which, with the help of a thin mucus covering, entrap small microorganisms. The two shells or valves of the brachiopod give it protection. The dorsal shell is larger than the ventral shell, and they are held together only by muscles. The tough, flexible stalk that attaches the brachiopod in place emerges through a notch in the upper valve.
ACCESSION #
19087939

 

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