TITLE

Reshuffle Boosts Military

PUB. DATE
July 2007
SOURCE
Asia Monitor: China & North East Asia Monitor;Jul2007, Vol. 14 Issue 7, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Country Report
DOC. TYPE
Country Report
ABSTRACT
The article offers information about the political outlook of North Korea. Military personnel in the country was reshuffled, where recent personnel assigned in North Korea are expected to strengthen the influence of the already powerful military. This move aims to reduce chances of nuclear disarmament as well as counterbalancing senior officers with on another in arranging for a collective leadership in the post King Jong II era.
ACCESSION #
25526227

 

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