TITLE

How the Coast Guard Got Its Groove Back

AUTHOR(S)
Blace, Mark
PUB. DATE
May 2005
SOURCE
Government Executive;5/15/2005, Vol. 37 Issue 8, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's views on the post-September 11 overload to the U.S. Coast Guard services like balancing people, equipment and partnerships. The author refers to his experience with his friend and fellow captain Joe Castillo as commander of Group New Orleans in June 2005 in this context. According to the author, the Cost Guard is doing more of its traditional missions than ever while significantly increasing the vigilance.
ACCESSION #
24336659

 

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