TITLE

Editorial: Don't be fooled by stem cell hype

PUB. DATE
November 2007
SOURCE
New Scientist;11/24/2007, Vol. 196 Issue 2631, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The author discusses the process of creating stem cells from skin cells which was created in 2007. The process would remove objections of harvesting embryonic stem cells, but the process involves the use of viruses to force changes to the skin cells. This means that it is not safe for large scale research at this time.
ACCESSION #
27924485

 

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