TITLE

Our military presence in Afghanistan is part of the problem, not the solution

PUB. DATE
August 2009
SOURCE
New Statesman;8/17/2009, Vol. 138 Issue 4962, p4
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
In this editorial the author comments on British involvement in the war in Afghanistan. It is noted that British and American authorities have put forward a number of reasons for the war but the primary one has been the need to deny the al-Qaeda terrorist organization military bases in the region. The editorial also calls for a political, rather than a military, solution to the Afghan conflict.
ACCESSION #
43686181

 

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