TITLE

Sound the Retreat

PUB. DATE
December 1997
SOURCE
National Review;12/8/1997, Vol. 49 Issue 23, p14
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Editorial
ABSTRACT
The article reflects on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's clandestine programs to build weapons of mass destruction in 1997. It argues that Hussein's sudden objection to the presence of Americans in the United Nations inspection team that monitors his programs was a phony objection. It emphasizes that the prospect of U.S. military action did not, as some timid souls would have it, constitute a crisis. It predicts that once the program is completed, Hussein will intimidate the entire Middle East.
ACCESSION #
9712050570

 

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