TITLE

Global warming: is it already too late?

AUTHOR(S)
Lynas, Mark
PUB. DATE
May 2004
SOURCE
New Statesman;5/17/2004, Vol. 133 Issue 4688, p28
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Essay
ABSTRACT
Presents an essay on climate change and global warming. Rise of carbon dioxide levels; Paper published by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Hadley Center in "Nature" regarding the results of a computer simulation of the future global carbon cycle; Impact of methane hydrate failure on the global environment; Reference to the motion picture "The Day After Tomorrow"; Need for global warming to be addressed in the political arena; Military implications of climate change.
ACCESSION #
13101800

 

Related Articles

  • Endogenous Land use and the Ricardian Valuation of Climate Change. Timmins, Christopher // Environmental & Resource Economics;Jan2006, Vol. 33 Issue 1, p119 

    The Ricardian technique uses cross-sectional variation in the capitalized value of climate in land to infer the agricultural costs or benefits of dynamic climate change. While a practical approach for predicting the consequences of global warming with readily available data, it may yield biased...

  • Welcome to a Different Planet. van Gelder, Sarah // YES! Magazine;Spring2008, Issue 45, p1 

    The article discusses the dangers confronting the environment because of global warming worldwide. It notes that as temperature rises, there is an increase in disruption to the earth's interconnected systems that keep the climate stable and within the narrow range that can support life. The...

  • No Single Way to Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Jennings, Lane // Futurist;May/Jun2008, Vol. 42 Issue 3, p14 

    The article reflects on various geological evidences suggesting the possible effects of global warming to our planet, as of May 2008. The section highlights various comments given by scholars studying the changes in earth's temperature. Geological evidence illustrates that the planet has...

  • The Devil Is in the Clouds. Guterl, Fred; Theil, Stefan; Pape, Eric; Valla, Marie // Newsweek (Atlantic Edition);7/12/2004 (Atlantic Edition), Vol. 144 Issue 2, p44 

    Discusses how meteorologists use reports on global warming to predict long-term weather patterns. Consideration of how France issued public health warnings due to record-high temperatures in Provence; Debate among scientists about how much warming will occur over the next century; Use of...

  • The Devil Is in the Clouds. Guterl, Fred; Theil, Stefan; Pape, Eric; Valla, Marie // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);7/12/2004 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 144 Issue 2, p42 

    Discusses how meteorologists use reports on global warming to predict long-term weather patterns. Consideration of how France issued public health warnings due to record-high temperatures in Provence; Debate among scientists about how much warming will occur over the next century; Use of...

  • Zeroing in on Climate Change. Zimmer, Carl // Newsweek (Pacific Edition);12/1/2003 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 142 Issue 22, p41 

    Studies suggest that even a modest rise in temperature would make the global average as high as it has been in the last 150,000 years. Although temperature measurements taken on the ground have shown a clear warming trend at least back to the 1950s, important satellite data have until now shown...

  • Global Warming: It's Time to Act. Schweiger, Larry J. // National Wildlife (World Edition);Dec2005/Jan2006, Vol. 44 Issue 1, p9 

    The article presents a discussion on global warming. Global warming is no longer just a matter of scientific intrigue. Today, it is much more than a distant concern. It is a reality that must be addressed with a sense of urgency. Its consequences are already being felt by millions around the...

  • VANISHING ALASKA. Roosevelt, Margot // Time;10/4/2004, Vol. 164 Issue 14, p68 

    Discusses how global warming has caused Alaskan Eskimo villages such as the Inupiaq to lose coastline to the ocean since 1997. Consideration of how the permafrost beneath the beaches thaws as the sea ice thins and the climate warms; Vulnerability of the residents to violent storms due to the...

  • MELTDOWN! Lemonick, Michael D. // Time;11/22/2004, Vol. 164 Issue 21, p72 

    Mentions the drastic impact that global warming could have on Arctic regions. Results of four years of intensive research by a group of more than 250 scientists, the Arctic Council, on global warming in the Arctic over the past 50 years; Findings that the Arctic Ocean ice has decreased by at...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics