TITLE

Inside the Framework

PUB. DATE
May 2009
SOURCE
Sea Power;May2009, Vol. 52 Issue 5, p84
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Interview
ABSTRACT
An interview with Dan Smith, president of Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems (IDS) in the U.S., is presented. When asked about his biggest concern, he refers the capacity of the defense industry to help fulfill the needs of the country. He explores on impact of the economic downturn on the company's programs and competitiveness. He also comments on the condition of suppliers during the slowdown of the economy.
ACCESSION #
39976320

 

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