TITLE

Of mice and morals

PUB. DATE
October 1990
SOURCE
New Scientist;10/20/90, Vol. 128 Issue 1739, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Comments on the European Patent Office's (EPO) refusal of a patent on a mouse whose genetically-induced susceptibility to cancer makes it valuable in research. Development of the genetically-engineered mouse by Harvard University; Rejection of Harvard's application on the grounds that the mouse constituted a new variety of mouse; Patent convention forbidding patents on innovations considered to conflict with public morality; Ethical aspects of the patenting of animals.
ACCESSION #
9010290284

 

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