TITLE

Toward a National Consensus

AUTHOR(S)
Lagemann, Ellen Condliffe
PUB. DATE
January 2009
SOURCE
Education Week;1/21/2009, Vol. 28 Issue 18, p44
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The article suggests that the No Child Left Behind Act has hurt American education. According to the author, the incentives in the act deprive students of the opportunities to study interesting topics and make schools more likely to turn their back on students that are failing. Methods to fix education in the country are proposed.
ACCESSION #
36354166

 

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