TITLE

FTC: No faux social messaging

AUTHOR(S)
Booker, Ellis
PUB. DATE
October 2009
SOURCE
B to B;10/12/2009, Vol. 94 Issue 13, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The article comments on the effects of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) new rule which requires bloggers to clearly disclose any connection to an advertiser, on social media community. Andy Sernovitz, chief executive officer (CEO) of the Social Media Council, says that marketers should not be allowed to use bloggers for deceptive advertising. It is also said that with open disclosure and authenticity, the FTC rule will be beneficial for both the marketers and bloggers.
ACCESSION #
45036745

 

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