TITLE

Hospice and palliative care: The time to get involved is now

AUTHOR(S)
Kemle, Kathy
PUB. DATE
January 2011
SOURCE
JAAPA: Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (;Jan2011, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
In this article, the author discusses hospice and palliative care. She reports that hospice offers the best care to people on the last stage of their lives, providing spiritual support, and giving psychological support for the dying patient and the family. She also emphasizes what physician's assistants can do to the patients in hospice care.
ACCESSION #
58620843

 

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