TITLE

Business rates--not a green tax

AUTHOR(S)
Cooper, Andrew
PUB. DATE
October 2011
SOURCE
EG: Estates Gazette;10/29/2011, Issue 1143, p72
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The author explores his views on sustainable buildings. He considers these structures as more valuable and can attract a higher business rate. He explains why it would be better to tax them at a lower rate. He advises the British government to review hot it taxes commercial property through business rates.
ACCESSION #
69874934

 

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