TITLE

WHY CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SECTORS MEAN PROBATION WON'T WORK AS A COMMODITY

AUTHOR(S)
McGarry, Samantha
PUB. DATE
November 2013
SOURCE
British Journal of Community Justice;Winter2013, Vol. 11 Issue 2/3, p103
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Opinion
ABSTRACT
The author comments on the proposed changes to the delivery of probation services in Great Britain with the preference for an untested use of voluntary and private sector agencies. She explains why the proposed privatization of probation services will not work due to cultural differences between sectors. She also argues against the government's belief that organisations perform best with a financial incentive.
ACCESSION #
93815894

 

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