TITLE

SPONDEE

AUTHOR(S)
BROGAN, T. V. F.
PUB. DATE
June 2012
SOURCE
Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry & Poetics 4th Edition;6/2/2012, p1351
SOURCE TYPE
Encyclopedia
DOC. TYPE
Reference Entry
ABSTRACT
Information about spondee is presented. It refers to libatation in classical prosody which is considered a unit of measure with long syllables. It outlines its role as an optional substitute for a dactyl in a metrical marking of closure. It also notes the Relative Stress Principle (RSP) of linguist Otto Jespersen.
ACCESSION #
112415270

 

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